Lake Mead Today      News, information, photos, videos and events for Lake Mead!





We Support
Vegas Helping Vegas
Free Las Vegas Coupons


Lake Mead Information
    Home
    Water Levels
    Parks Fees
    Fish in Lake Mead
    Fishing License Information
    Lake Mead Marinas



Columns




Fish in Lake Mead


Rainbow Trout

Rainbow Trout

Body usually olive to greenish-blue on the back; belly white to silver; sides usually show prominent red or pink streak. Fish from lakes sometimes lose all color and appear silvery. Irregular spots on back, sides, head, dorsal fin and tail. No teeth on back of tongue. Native to the Columbia River drainage of northeastern Nevada, but stocked extensively from hatcheries throughout Nevada. Nevada's most abundant game fish species occurring in 295 streams statewide and in a large number of lakes and reservoirs.

Largemouth Bass

Largemouth bass

Dark green on back and sides, silvery below. Belly is greenish-white. A broad dark band on the sides which consists of irregular patches touching together. Dorsal fin with 9 to 10 sharp spines, nearly separated from the soft rays by a deep notch. Upper jaw when closed extends at least to the rear edge of the eye in adults, usually beyond. Abundant in lakes and reservoirs throughout Nevada.

Channel Catfish

Channel Catfish

No scales, tail deeply forked with pointed lobes. Body pale bluish-olive above and bluish-white below. Spots vary from a few to many over much of the body and may not occur on large fish. Barbels extend from the chin and upper jaw. Both dorsal and pectoral fins have strong, sharp spines. Larger fish may be distinguished from the white catfish by the longer black barbels and more streamlined body form. Tail more deeply forked and head thinner and less rounded than white catfish. White on belly only to forward edge of anal fin. Found in warm water streams and reservoirs in northwestern and southern Nevada.

Striped Bass

Striped Bass

Body olive-green above, shading through silvery on sides to white on belly with brassy reflection. There are 7 to 8 longitudinal dark stripes following the scale rows. A spiny dorsal fin is barely separated from a soft dorsal fin. The tail is forked and the body is cylindrical in shape. Striped bass occur in only a few of the larger lakes in Nevada including Lake Mead and Lake Mohave. The fish can become very large with some specimens larger than 50 pounds.

Bullhead Catfish

Bullhead Catfish

No scales. Tail only slightly forked, with rounded lobes. Adults are blackish, dark olive or dark brown. Belly is yellow, greenish-white or white. Chin barbels are entirely black. The pectoral fin spine is smooth. Found in farm ponds and reservoirs throughout Nevada.

Crappie

Crappie

Silver-olive with numerous black or dark green splotches on the sides. Forehead is dished and the snout is turned up. Five or more anal spines and seven or eight dorsal spines. Base of the dorsal fin is about the same length as the base of the anal fin. Body compressed from side to side. Found in warmwater lakes and reservoirs throughout Nevada.

Green Sunfish

Green Sunfish

Each scale is flecked with yellow or emerald green. Back and sides olive-green, and lower belly yellowish-copper or brassy. Body is short, stocky and deeply compressed from side to side. The gill cover has a broad, light margin, and it often has a black spot on the rear flap. The gill cover bone is stiff all the way to the margin which is different from most other sunfish.

Bluegill Sunfish

Bluegill Sunfish

Very colorful. Light to dark blue on bright purple. In breeding season, the breast of males is red. Gill covers often blue with a black spot on the rear of the "ear flap." Faint vertical bard on the sides. Dorsal fin has 10 spines followed without interruption by 10 or 12 rays. The mouth is small and when closed, barely reaches the front of the eye. Body deep for its length and compressed from side to side. Found in small farm ponds throughout northwestern and southern Nevada.

Carp

Carp

The lowly carp was first introduced to Nevada in the late 1800s in hopes of providing food for the early settlers. It has since spread throughout the state and is considered a menace by most anglers and biologists. Carp are rather long lived, past 20 years, and reach large sizes, up to 50 pounds. The current Lake Mead record is a 25-pound, 12-ounce fish that was caught by John Hunt of England in 2003. The state record is 34 pounds, 10 ounces, was 38 inches in length and was captured out of the Truckee River by Justin Edland in 2005. The problem with carp has to do with their prolific nature (high number of eggs) and their feeding habits. They spawn in the late spring, usually June, with larger fish producing up to a million eggs. Carp can literally “take over” a body of water. Also, being bottom feeders, their constant rooting around for food stirs up bottom materials, thus increasing water turbidity and decreasing pond productivity.

Tilapia

Tilapia

Young nondescript gray with a black spot at rear of dorsal fin; adults generally blue-gray shading to white on the belly; borders of dorsal and caudal fins with red to pink borders; broken lateral line and the spiny dorsal fin is joined to the soft dorsal fin.

SPECIAL NOTE Possession and transport of live Tilapia in Nevada is illegal. They can only be possessed if dead, so anglers who catch and want to eat a Tilapia should kill them immediately and place them on ice. These fish are classified as a nuisance species, which could cause serous damage to sport and native fisheries in other waters. If not to be kept for consumption, Tilapia should be killed immediately and disposed of properly.
Protected Fish in Lake Mead
The following species of fish may be found in Lake Mead. If you catch any of these fish you are required to return them to the water where caught. The Park service requests that you report the catching of these fish to them as soon as possible. You can contact them at (702) 293-8950


Humpback Chub

Humpback Chub

Razor Back Sucker

Razor Back

Bonytail Chub

bonytail Chub

Colorado Squafish

colorado Squawfish
Video Features
Photo Features

Callville Bay Marina Storm Damage
Resources



© 2009 - 2014 LakeMeadToday.com